Can I Hang? Ideal Time to Replace Isotonic Crystalloid Intravenous Fluids and Sets to Prevent Fluid Contamination and Blood Stream Infection: a Knowledge Summary

  • Erik Davis Fausak Bel-Rea Institute of Animal Technology 1681 S. Dayton Denver, CO 80247
  • Samantha Rae Spelts Bel-Rea Institute of Animal Technology 1681 S. Dayton Denver, CO 80247
  • Rebecca Lee Brown Bel-Rea Institute of Animal Technology 1681 S. Dayton Denver, CO 80247

Published:

2016-11-16

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.18849/ve.v1i4.47

Abstract

Clinical bottom line

Based on very poor veterinary and human evidence, fluid bags and IV sets should be changed every 96 hours whether on one or multiple patients. Additionally, supportive evidence suggests that creating a routine of wiping ports with alcohol prior to injection or withdrawal may significantly decrease the likelihood of fluid contamination. This certainly seems to be an area that needs more research. 


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Author Biographies

Erik Davis Fausak, Bel-Rea Institute of Animal Technology 1681 S. Dayton Denver, CO 80247

Erik is a faculty member and archivist at Bel-Rea Institute of Animal Technology.  His primary objective is to train veterinary technicians and nurses in evidence-based strategies of decision making.

Samantha Rae Spelts, Bel-Rea Institute of Animal Technology 1681 S. Dayton Denver, CO 80247

Student at Bel-Rea Institute of Animal Technology with an interest in shelter medicine, anticipated graduation date, September 6, 2016.

Rebecca Lee Brown, Bel-Rea Institute of Animal Technology 1681 S. Dayton Denver, CO 80247

Student at Bel-Rea Institute of Animal Technology with an interest in shelter medicine, anticipated graduation date, September 6, 2016.

References

Carr, Anthony P. (2015) New Studies in Veterinary Internal Medicine: Bacterial Infections. DVM 360, 46 (4), pp.M1–M3. Available at: http://veterinarynews.dvm360.com/new-studies-veterinary-internal-medicine-bacterial-infections?pageID=2 [Accessed February 4, 2016].

Guillaumin, J. et al. (2013) Influence of Hang Time on Bacterial Colonization of Intravenous Bags in a Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Setting (abst). Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care, 23, p.S6.

Matthews, K.A. and Taylor, D.K. (2011) Assessment of Sterility in Fluid Bags Maintained for Chronic Use. Journal of the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science, 50 (5), pp.708–712.

Sabino, C. V. and Weese, J.S. (2006) Contamination of Multiple-Dose Vials in a Veterinary Hospital. The Canadian Veterinary Journal, 47 (8), p.779.

Ullman, A.J. et al. (2013) Optimal Timing for Intravascular Administration Set Replacement. The Cochrane database of systematic reviews, 9 (9), p.CD003588. Available at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24037784 [Accessed October 1, 2016].

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Vol. 1 No. 4 (2016): Our fourth issue

Section: Knowledge Summaries

Categories :  Small Animal  /  Dogs  /  Cats  /  Rabbits  /  Production Animal  /  Cattle  /  Sheep  /  Pig  /  Equine  /  Exotics  /