https://veterinaryevidence.org/index.php/ve/issue/feed Veterinary Evidence 2020-11-25T12:59:08+00:00 Jennifer Morris editor@veterinaryevidence.org Open Journal Systems Veterinary Evidence is an online only, open access, peer-reviewed journal owned and published by RCVS Knowledge. It publishes content relating to evidence-based veterinary medicine (EBVM) and its application in veterinary practice to enhance the quality of care provided to patients. https://veterinaryevidence.org/index.php/ve/article/view/308 Does the use of topical honey result in a faster rate of second intention wound healing in dogs? 2020-11-25T12:59:08+00:00 Louisa Marcombes louisa.marcombes@gmail.com <p><strong>PICO question</strong></p> <p>In healthy dogs undergoing open wound management, does the topical application of honey, when compared to wounds treated with daily saline washes only, reduce the time to complete wound healing?</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Editorial notice:</strong>&nbsp;Upon conducting the literature search for this Knowledge Summary the author discovered that the same&nbsp;paper had been published in two separate journals and that a third paper by the same author appeared to have used data from the same experimental subjects as the duplicate publication, despite reporting different methodology. The duplicate publications have been appraised by the author as one paper. The editorial office alerted the journals in question which resulted in the article that appeared in the Iranian Journal of Veterinary Surgery (Jalali, F.S. S., Tajik, H., Saifzaideh, S and Fartash, B. (2007b) Topical Application of Natural Urmia Honey on Experimental Burn Wounds in the Dog: Clinical and Microbiological Studies. <em>Iranian Journal of Veterinary Surgery.</em>&nbsp;2(2),<strong>&nbsp;</strong>13–21)&nbsp;being retracted:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.ivsajournals.com/article_114759.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">http://www.ivsajournals.com/article_114759.html</a>. See&nbsp;<a href="https://veterinaryevidence.org/index.php/ve/misconduct-policy" target="_blank" rel="noopener">our own policy on duplicate publication</a>&nbsp;for more information.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Clinical bottom line</strong></p> <p><strong>Category of research question</strong></p> <p>Treatment</p> <p><strong>The number and type of study designs reviewed</strong></p> <p>Two studies satisfied the inclusion criteria for answering the PICO; both were prospective randomised controlled trials</p> <p><strong>Strength of evidence</strong></p> <p>Weak</p> <p><strong>Outcomes reported</strong></p> <p>The studies demonstrated a possible effect size of clinical importance of the use of honey in the treatment of canine wounds in terms of time to complete wound healing and antibacterial effect. However, the strength of the evidence provided by both studies is severely weakened by flaws in trial design, implementation and reporting, and the possible risk of pseudo replication between the two trials reported</p> <p><strong>Conclusion</strong></p> <p>The use of topical honey in canine open wound management may reduce time to complete wound healing. However, the evidence for this is weak. At present, the evidence that use of topical honey in canine wounds reduces time to healing is insufficient to warrant a change in clinical practice</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="color: #0000ff;"><a style="color: #0000ff;" href="http://www.ebvmlearning.org/apply/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">How to apply this evidence in practice</a></span></p> <p>The application of evidence into practice should take into account multiple factors, not limited to: individual clinical expertise, patient’s circumstances and owners’ values, country, location or clinic where you work, the individual case in front of you, the availability of therapies and resources.</p> <p>Knowledge Summaries are a resource to help reinforce or inform decision making. They do not override the responsibility or judgement of the practitioner to do what is best for the animal in their care.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><img src="https://www.veterinaryevidence.org/rcvskmod/icons/oa-icon.jpg" alt="Open Access"> <img src="https://www.veterinaryevidence.org/rcvskmod/icons/pr-icon.jpg" alt="Peer Reviewed"></p> 2020-11-25T12:47:16+00:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Louisa Marcombes https://veterinaryevidence.org/index.php/ve/article/view/335 Managing atopic dermatitis in dogs: are antihistamines as effective as glucocorticoids? 2020-11-18T15:59:58+00:00 Sarah Long sarahmlong@hotmail.co.uk <p><strong>PICO question</strong><strong><br><br></strong></p> <p>In dogs with atopic dermatitis, are antihistamines as effective as glucocorticoids at reducing the severity of clinical signs?</p> <p><strong>&nbsp;</strong></p> <p><strong>Clinical bottom line</strong></p> <p><strong>Category of research question</strong></p> <p>Treatment</p> <p><strong>The number and type of study designs reviewed</strong></p> <p>Two randomised control trials and one crossover placebo-controlled trial</p> <p><strong>Strength of evidence</strong></p> <p>Critical appraisal of the selected papers meeting the inclusion criteria collectively provide weak evidence in terms of their experimental design and implementation</p> <p><strong>Outcomes reported</strong></p> <p>The outcomes reported were conflicting. Two studies reported that fexofenadine may be as effective as methylprednisolone at reducing the severity of clinical signs after 6 weeks of treatment however, the study size was small in one and there was limited reporting of the data in the other. The third study, the crossover placebo-controlled trial, tested a variety of antihistamines and prednisone with limited reporting of statistical analysis of the data and found that antihistamines did not provide a sufficient reduction in pruritus unless combined with prednisone</p> <p><strong>Conclusion</strong></p> <p>In view of the strength of evidence and the outcomes from the studies, there is insufficient quality of evidence to answer the PICO question and further comparative study is needed</p> <p><strong>&nbsp;</strong></p> <p><a href="http://www.ebvmlearning.org/apply/">How to apply this evidence in practice</a></p> <p>The application of evidence into practice should take into account multiple factors, not limited to: individual clinical expertise, patient’s circumstances and owners’ values, country, location or clinic where you work, the individual case in front of you, the availability of therapies and resources.</p> <p>Knowledge Summaries are a resource to help reinforce or inform decision making. They do not override the responsibility or judgement of the practitioner to do what is best for the animal in their care.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><img src="https://www.veterinaryevidence.org/rcvskmod/icons/oa-icon.jpg" alt="Open Access"> <img src="https://www.veterinaryevidence.org/rcvskmod/icons/pr-icon.jpg" alt="Peer Reviewed"></p> 2020-11-18T15:48:41+00:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Sarah Long https://veterinaryevidence.org/index.php/ve/article/view/340 In dogs undergoing anaesthesia do pre-anaesthetic gastroprotectants reduce gastro-oesophageal reflux? 2020-11-12T11:44:30+00:00 Leanne Barry leanne_barry@hotmail.com <p><strong>PICO question</strong></p> <p>In dogs undergoing anaesthesia do pre-anaesthetic gastroprotectants reduce gastro-oesophageal reflux?</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Clinical bottom line</strong></p> <p><strong>Category of research question</strong></p> <p>Treatment</p> <p><strong>The number and type of study designs reviewed</strong></p> <p>Five papers were critically reviewed. There was a randomised prospective study, two randomised blinded prospective studies, randomised non-blinded prospective study and a randomised, double blinded and placebo-controlled prospective study.</p> <p><strong>Strength of evidence</strong></p> <p>Moderate</p> <p><strong>Outcomes reported</strong></p> <p>Evidence of high quality suggests omeprazole or cisapride with esomeprazole decrease the incidence of gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) in the anaesthetised dog. In addition, a study of lower quality showed that continuous infusion of metoclopramide at a higher than normal dose rate decreased the incidence of GOR.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion</strong></p> <p>Omeprazole or cisapride with esomeprazole decreases the incidence of GOR in the anaesthetised dog.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="color: #0000ff;"><a style="color: #0000ff;" href="http://www.ebvmlearning.org/apply/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">How to apply this evidence in practice</a></span></p> <p>The application of evidence into practice should take into account multiple factors, not limited to: individual clinical expertise, patient’s circumstances and owners’ values, country, location or clinic where you work, the individual case in front of you, the availability of therapies and resources.</p> <p>Knowledge Summaries are a resource to help reinforce or inform decision-making. They do not override the responsibility or judgement of the practitioner to do what is best for the animal in their care</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><img src="https://www.veterinaryevidence.org/rcvskmod/icons/oa-icon.jpg" alt="Open Access"> <img src="https://www.veterinaryevidence.org/rcvskmod/icons/pr-icon.jpg" alt="Peer Reviewed"></p> 2020-11-12T11:40:50+00:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Leanne Barry https://veterinaryevidence.org/index.php/ve/article/view/300 In dogs with congestive heart failure, is torasemide superior to furosemide as a first line diuretic treatment? 2020-11-04T14:23:53+00:00 Leo Packham lafpackham@outlook.com <p><strong>PICO question</strong></p> <p>In dogs with congestive heart failure, does the use of torasemide as a first line diuretic result in a superior survival time when compared to furosemide?</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Clinical bottom line</strong></p> <p><strong>Category of research question</strong></p> <p>Treatment</p> <p><strong>The number and type of study designs reviewed</strong></p> <p>Five studies were critically appraised, they were all prospective randomised controlled trials</p> <p><strong>Strength of evidence</strong></p> <p>Moderate</p> <p><strong>Outcomes reported</strong></p> <p>There is currently a lack of studies looking at comparing furosemide directly with torasemide in patients with congestive heart failure. There are many similarly drawn conclusions from the studies: torasemide is not inferior to furosemide in the treatment of CHF, torasemide is comparable to furosemide at one tenth the dose (or less) and that torasemide may be more effective at diuresis than furosemide with a prolonged duration of action</p> <p><strong>Conclusion</strong></p> <p>There is currently no clear and obvious benefit for the use of torasemide, over furosemide, as a first line diuretic for dogs with congestive heart failure</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="color: #0000ff;"><a style="color: #0000ff;" href="http://www.ebvmlearning.org/apply/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">How to apply this evidence in practice</a></span></p> <p>The application of evidence into practice should take into account multiple factors, not limited to: individual clinical expertise, patient’s circumstances and owners’ values, country, location or clinic where you work, the individual case in front of you, the availability of therapies and resources.</p> <p>Knowledge Summaries are a resource to help reinforce or inform decision-making. They do not override the responsibility or judgement of the practitioner to do what is best for the animal in their care.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><img src="https://www.veterinaryevidence.org/rcvskmod/icons/oa-icon.jpg" alt="Open Access"> <img src="https://www.veterinaryevidence.org/rcvskmod/icons/pr-icon.jpg" alt="Peer Reviewed"></p> 2020-11-04T14:18:49+00:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Leo Packham https://veterinaryevidence.org/index.php/ve/article/view/349 Veterinary Telemedicine: A literature review 2020-10-30T15:51:36+00:00 Lori Massin Teller lteller@tamu.edu Heather K Moberly hmoberly@tamu.edu <p>As telemedicine becomes more mainstream in the veterinary profession, it is important to understand when and how to utilise it successfully, and its potential downsides. This literature review supports the use of veterinary telemedicine for teleconsultations, and using wearable and mobile health (mHealth) devices for monitoring animal health. Data supporting the provision of virtual care directly to a client within an established veterinarian-client-patient relationship (VCPR) is more limited, and some of what we know comes from paediatric medicine on the human side. As we have learned from human health care providers, we must be aware there could be a tendency to overprescribe antimicrobials in a virtual visit compared to an in-person visit. Data have also shown telemedicine can be just as effective in diagnosing respiratory disease when compared to traditional visits to a doctor’s office or hospital. Telemedicine is especially effective in areas where access to care is limited, whether because of geography, finances, or lack of resources. Overall, veterinary telemedicine and telehealth can provide positive results.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><img src="https://www.veterinaryevidence.org/rcvskmod/icons/oa-icon.jpg" alt="Open Access"> <img src="https://www.veterinaryevidence.org/rcvskmod/icons/pr-icon.jpg" alt="Peer Reviewed"></p> 2020-10-30T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Lori Massin Teller, Heather K Moberly