https://veterinaryevidence.org/index.php/ve/issue/feed Veterinary Evidence 2020-07-09T13:21:02+00:00 Jennifer Morris Jennifer@rcvsknowledge.org Open Journal Systems Veterinary Evidence is an online only, open access, peer-reviewed journal owned and published by RCVS Knowledge. It publishes content relating to evidence-based veterinary medicine (EBVM) and its application in veterinary practice to enhance the quality of care provided to patients. https://veterinaryevidence.org/index.php/ve/article/view/299 Developments in surgical fluid therapy rates in veterinary medicine 2020-07-09T13:21:02+00:00 Kristina Naden knaden@unitec.ac.nz <p><strong>PICO question</strong></p> <p>Is there sufficient evidence to show surgical fluid therapy delivered at the recommended 3 mL/kg/hour for cats and 5 mL/kg/hour for dogs leads to a better outcome compared with widely accepted rates of 10 mL/kg/hour for both cats and dogs?</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Clinical bottom line</strong></p> <p><strong>Category of research question</strong></p> <p>Treatment</p> <p><strong>The number and type of study designs reviewed</strong></p> <p>Five studies were appraised. Two of these were opinion pieces, with one non-comparative prospective study, one randomised controlled trial, and one case control study.</p> <p><strong>Strength of evidence</strong></p> <p>Weak</p> <p><strong>Outcomes reported</strong></p> <p>Currently there is limited evidence to show that the surgical fluid therapy recommendations made by the 2013 Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association guidelines (Davis et al., 2013) for cats and dogs lead to a better outcome than accepted fluid therapy rates used. Fluid overload in humans can cause long-term adverse effects, however the same effects have yet to be shown specifically in veterinary patients</p> <p><strong>Conclusion</strong></p> <p>No evidence was found that provides strong, conclusive evidence that the 2013 recommendations by the American Animal Hospital Association and American Association of Feline Practitioners leads to a better outcome for both cats and dogs. The resulting research outlined below identifies a need to conduct clinical studies on the effects of fluid therapy on cats and dogs, and identify clear monitoring protocols to minimise and ideally avoid, fluid overload. When adequate, valid clinical studies have been carried out, this will provide sufficient information for the development of evidence-based recommended rates of fluid therapy for veterinary medicine, in a range of contexts</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="color: #0000ff;"><a style="color: #0000ff;" href="http://www.ebvmlearning.org/apply/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">How to apply this evidence in practice</a></span></p> <p>The application of evidence into practice should take into account multiple factors, not limited to: individual clinical expertise, patient’s circumstances and owners’ values, country, location or clinic where you work, the individual case in front of you, the availability of therapies and resources.</p> <p>Knowledge Summaries are a resource to help reinforce or inform decision-making. They do not override the responsibility or judgement of the practitioner to do what is best for the animal in their care.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><img src="https://www.veterinaryevidence.org/rcvskmod/icons/oa-icon.jpg" alt="Open Access"> <img src="https://www.veterinaryevidence.org/rcvskmod/icons/pr-icon.jpg" alt="Peer Reviewed"></p> 2020-07-09T13:16:45+00:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Kristina Naden https://veterinaryevidence.org/index.php/ve/article/view/309 In mares with placentitis does the duration of antibiotic treatment affect foal outcome? 2020-07-03T13:07:17+00:00 Elizabeth Barter elizabeth.barter@sconeequine.com.au <p><strong>PICO question</strong></p> <p>In mares with placentitis does treatment with long-term antibiotics result in improved foal viability when compared to repeated short courses of 7 to 10 days?</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Clinical bottom line</strong></p> <p><strong>Category of research question</strong></p> <p>Treatment</p> <p><strong>The number and type of study designs reviewed</strong></p> <p>The literature search identified six publications that included length of antibiotic treatment and foetal outcome. The publications consisted of four non-randomised non-blinded controlled trials and two randomised non-blinded controlled trials</p> <p><strong>Strength of evidence</strong></p> <p>Collectively there was weak evidence to support either an intermittent or continuous antibiotic protocol in the treatment of placentitis in mares</p> <p><strong>Outcomes reported</strong></p> <p>The literature involved experimental induction of ascending placentitis with foal survival or viability as the outcome</p> <p><strong>Conclusion</strong></p> <p>Further research is required into the diagnosis of placentitis, length of treatment and choice of antibiotic/s to penetrate the uterus in a diseased state</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="color: #0000ff;"><a style="color: #0000ff;" href="http://www.ebvmlearning.org/apply/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">How to apply this evidence in practice</a></span></p> <p>The application of evidence into practice should take into account multiple factors, not limited to: individual clinical expertise, patient’s circumstances and owners’ values, country, location or clinic where you work, the individual case in front of you, the availability of therapies and resources.</p> <p>Knowledge Summaries are a resource to help reinforce or inform decision-making. They do not override the responsibility or judgement of the practitioner to do what is best for the animal in their care.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><img src="https://www.veterinaryevidence.org/rcvskmod/icons/oa-icon.jpg" alt="Open Access"> <img src="https://www.veterinaryevidence.org/rcvskmod/icons/pr-icon.jpg" alt="Peer Reviewed"></p> 2020-07-03T13:01:02+00:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Elizabeth Barter